It’s Not Just About Craft – How I’m Learning The Business Side of this Writing Thing

It’s Not Just About Craft – How I’m Learning The Business Side of this Writing Thing

It’s the first Wednesday of February, time for my Writing Journey post.  Thank you Insecure Writer’s Support Group for the monthly nudge. You’ll see lots of other fabulous insight by checking out the blogroll on their site here.

Insecure Writers Support Group BadgeThis month’s suggested question is What do you love about the genre you write in most often?  That’s a great question, but difficult for me to answer.  I wrote all kinds of nonfiction. These days, speculative fiction, YA, fantasy, historical, mythical, old school science fiction, folklore, legend, or some inexplicable combination push their way out of my brain. And my in-the-works upmarket humorous women’s fiction. Sheesh, I recently even entered a poetry contest. My creations are not always easily categorized. I don’t swim in a single lake at a time.

Today I write about a conference I recently attended, Superstars Writing. I found myself attracted to this seminar because their tagline is Teaching You the Business of Being a Writer. I wanted to learn the how of making a career of this  passion of mine. I didn’t want keep saying that all I’ve got in print is non-fiction and that it isn’t recent. I wanted to be confident in knowing that what I write is marketable. Plus my calendar was open that week and attendance required minimal travel. So I signed up.

As conference week approached, I did touch base with others and found myself slightly intimated by the level of enthusiasm I encountered. I was unsure about the significance of  Tribe (or Eggs Benedict, for that matter).

Oh well. I decided that the content and the caliber of the faculty would outweigh an uncertainty I had about mention of clans or breakfast food.

I was right. I came away with information and practical advice I can use. I heard all kinds of things about this industry that has changed so dramatically in both the ancient and recent past. I learned about the Business of Writing, as advertised. I am now far better positioned to further my writing career.

I wasn’t able to nail down a consensus on the oxford comma, but let’s be fair. That isn’t actually all that relevant.

So, the four days I spent in hotel meeting rooms was definitely worth my time. The caliber of faculty was first rate; they know their stuff. I learned a lot.

But, as I’d been told, this conference is like no other.  As I headed toward the elevator after check-in, I was greeted by Chris, I wearing a Superstars badge. I looked around to see what I’d dropped or, truly, if she was addressing someone behind me. She wasn’t.

Except it wasn’t just Chris. It was everyone. Other attendees. Staff. The Faculty. The Faculty!

This is unquestionably a professional conference.  Pitches, cdefinition of Triberitiquing, networking, all those usual things hummed merrily along. Books were sold, authors signed them. Panels and sessions covered this industry in depth.

But this conference is like no other. The pay-it-forward mentality of established professionals is admirable. Faculty and peers were genuinely accessible. The support, the inclusiveness, the genuine relationships, the positivity – yes, attending Superstars has absolutely had a positive impact on my writing career!

Tribe is defined as group of people with a common occupation, interest or goal.

I am unquestionably a member of this Tribe. Not a newbie, not a soon-you’ll-be-good-enough, not a bystander.  I have never felt so immediately included in a professional community.

I returned home, brain overflowing with tips and facts and information that’ll help me build my career. But I also brought home new friendships, a network of support like I’ve never experienced, and an understanding of the Eggs Benedict thing, (worth the price of admission folks, seriously).

I am a professional, and I have found my Tribe.

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Gabrielle V Brown

Gabrielle V. Brown has put words to paper since she could hold a crayon. She is published in technical and academic nonfiction and currently writes humor, speculative fiction, short stories and literary fiction. Gabrielle has lived all over the United States and now resides in the Colorado Rocky Mountains with her husband, daughter, and dog.

4 thoughts on “It’s Not Just About Craft – How I’m Learning The Business Side of this Writing Thing

  • February 7, 2018 at 12:40 pm
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    Your Superstars Writing Conference sounds great. I like conferences and especially those that talk about the business side of writing and/or the marketing side which goes along with the business side. I’m glad they did a fantastic job of getting to the nuts and bolts of the business side also. We writers need to know about the business side to maintain a stable income. Too many of us have no idea about what happens and that’s a pity.
    Wishing you all the best.
    Shalom aleichem,
    Pat G @ EverythingMustChange

    • February 9, 2018 at 9:20 pm
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      Thanks Pat. I can’t take any credit, all I did was show up and learn.

  • February 7, 2018 at 9:25 am
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    That sounds like a wonderful conference. There is sooo much good information out there on the business of publishing; sorting through it can be intimidating. Where was this conference held?
    Good article on tribe.

    • February 9, 2018 at 9:19 pm
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      Rhonda, the next Superstars Writing is in Colorado, February 2019. You can find out more at http://superstarswriting.com. Sorry, thought I’d included the link in my blog post.

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